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Can you see a difference? [message #1086] Sun, 17 August 2003 19:55 Go to next message
Mike the Younger  is currently offline Mike the Younger
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Is there a practical difference in the US between municipal police departments and county sherriff's offices Confused Does this difference affect Deputy Carstairs?
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #1088] Mon, 18 August 2003 07:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Janet  is currently offline Janet
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Mike the Younger wrote on Sun, 17 August 2003 18:55

Is there a practical difference in the US between municipal police departments and county sherriff's offices Confused Does this difference affect Deputy Carstairs?
This is not an easy question to answer as it varies from state to state.

Some states don't have counties per se. In New England, the towns are more like a combination of towns and townships. In other words, there are no places in the state that are unincorporated. There are no counties. There are the town police and the state authority (usually referred to as 'state police' but the terms vary).

In most midwestern and western states, the situation is different. Towns, villages, cities all have boundaries and they don't always ajoin. The gaps are sometimes known as 'unincorporated areas'. This is where the county sheriff comes in to play.

While the Sheriff and appointed deputies have jurisdiction over all territory within their county, they concentrate their efforts to the unincorporated areas.

Since I don't live inside any city or town limit, when someone's car ends up upside down in my driveway at 1:00 am, I call the Sheriff's Department. (BTW, that actually happened last winter.)

Generally, city and county cops know each other and are on good terms.

The names of the organizations can be different, too. In Cook county, Illinois (the county that Chicago is in) the county police department (sheriff) is called the Cook County Sheriff's Police.

As to how that affects Ms. Carstairs, who's to say. Relationships vary from state to state and we are dealing with a ficticious locale. Depending on what you had in mind, it could also vary on what sort of activity and where it might occur.

Ellen has been deliberately vague in some areas. This may be just another of those.

Hope this helps.


Janet

All that glitters is not Iron Pyrite
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #1094] Mon, 18 August 2003 21:43 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Carla  is currently offline Carla
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In my opinion, Tuck lives in the Midwest (Central United States) {Northwest Territory for the history buffs}. So it is not uncommon for a member of the Sheriff's department to live in suburban neighborhood. Which can look very urban, with malls near by, bus routes, etc.

The primary difference for Deputy Carstairs is that she is in a police car, the vast majority of her time, patrolling a modest large territory (100 to 150 square miles). Municipal police officers have a smaller territory and often need to walk part of the their assigned area.

Carla Smile

[Updated on: Mon, 18 August 2003 21:44]

Re: Can you see a difference? [message #1108] Sat, 23 August 2003 19:55 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ellen Hayes  is currently offline Ellen Hayes
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Also, in many urban areas, the Sheriff's Department controls the actual operation of the jails and courtrooms, as those are often county-based rather than city-based.

But not always.

This doesn't really make sense to us Americans either, so don't feel bad...


Ellen
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #1116] Sun, 24 August 2003 16:11 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Erin Halfelven  is currently offline Erin Halfelven
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Here in California, in both urban and rural areas, it's not unusual for the Sheriff's Office to operate as city police under contract to the city. Just another level of confusion. Smile

To add to that, we also have state park rangers, federal forest rangers, county park rangers, state game and fish rangers, county animal control, parole officers, city marshalls, state marshalls, federal marshalls, air marshalls, university police, school district police, transit police, airport police, railroad police, airport security, highway patrol, state police, tribal police, DEA, ATF, FBI, BLM, Border Patrol, customs agents, secret service, harbor police, Coast Guard, military police, shore patrol, air police. All of whom can and sometimes do carry guns and arrest people.

Besides those, we've got cops who don't carry guns and can't arrest people but can give out tickets. City park patrol, parking patrol and citizen's patrol, among others. Then there are private cops who may or may not carry guns even though they can't arrest people or give out tickets. And state and federal cops who carry guns but don't make arrests or give tickets: prison guards.

Is America a police state? Oddly, no. For all of that, we have fewer peace officers per capita than many other countries. We don't even rank in the top 100 and only Sweden and Switzerland of the Western European democracies have fewer police per capita than we do.

- Erin
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #1117] Sun, 24 August 2003 18:42 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mike the Younger  is currently offline Mike the Younger
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Thank you Erin. Smile That was a very fine job of muddifying the fuzzification. Very Happy

Ellen, I can now see how even an American can be confuzzled by US law enforcement Cool
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7239] Thu, 16 August 2012 10:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
stanman  is currently offline stanman
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According to the fanfics by Rachel, Tuck lives in the Northern States such as Maine, Rhode Island or possibly New England where Aunt Jane lives in Seasons House
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7240] Thu, 16 August 2012 23:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Sir Lee  is currently offline Sir Lee
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That's a definite "no" for the location, I think you misread Rachel's stories -- she is quite attentive to this sort of detail.

Tuck lives within reasonable driving distance of the King's Island amusement park, that is, generally speaking he's likely somewhere around Cincinnati, OH (the park visit was probably the most explicit reference, but there were other, supporting evidence).

Some fans argue, based on some trivia involving time zones and whatnot (search the forums, I'm not revisiting it again) that the town where Tuck & Co. live is actually somewhere in southeast Indiana, near Cincinnati. Definitely not New England.

Aunt Jane's Season House, OTOH, is located in Rhode Island. I don't recall right now who was the author who introduced this small piece of trivia. It's most likely Tigger, but it just might have been Ellen.


Don't call me Shirley. You will surely make me surly.
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7243] Fri, 17 August 2012 00:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
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From Rachel (in the story) going to Deighton U I've always figured that the actual city may well be Dayton Ohio but that Ellen has purposfully fudged enough that no one can possibly positively prove that theory. In Ohio IIRC some cities would have both the city police and the county sheriff. Why? That has been explained by others above. But in essence the city police would not run activities like the courts and jails if I remember the way Ohio is organized.
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7249] Fri, 17 August 2012 04:59 Go to previous messageGo to next message
stanman  is currently offline stanman
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Tuck/Val rode a motorbike from home to Seasons House. How long was the trip?
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7251] Fri, 17 August 2012 18:51 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
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Google Rode Island to Ohio. Several hundred miles to be certain. Since we don't know his home city we can only take a guess at the actual distance.
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7256] Fri, 17 August 2012 21:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Sir Lee  is currently offline Sir Lee
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Well, from Cincinnati to Providence, Google gives an estimate of about 800 to 900 miles (depending on route taken), but all of them add up to about 15 hours on the road -- the more direct routes apparently are slower ones. "Tuck Squared" begins at the end of Tu/Val's weekly psychologist appointment, so it's probably something like late Saturday morning. Give it a couple hours of talk, and then Val leaves for Rhode Island. But, Rachel DID mention that she slept in a motel during the trip. So, something like six to seven hours on the road on Saturday, plus eight to nine on Sunday, and she should arrive at Jane's by middle-to-late Sunday afternoon. Earlier if she really pushed herself on Saturday.

[Updated on: Fri, 17 August 2012 21:02]


Don't call me Shirley. You will surely make me surly.
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7279] Fri, 24 August 2012 05:16 Go to previous messageGo to next message
stanman  is currently offline stanman
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Is there a bridge or ferry to R.H.?
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7280] Sat, 25 August 2012 01:23 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Sir Lee  is currently offline Sir Lee
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stanman wrote on Fri, 24 August 2012 06:16

Is there a bridge or ferry to R.H.?

Stan, look at a map, willya? The state of Rhode Island is named after an island, not located in one. Most of it (like the capital, Providence) is in the mainland, in fact.

But, to address your main question... even if Seasons Manor were located in one of the islands, we know for a fact that Tuck arrived there by train. So, wherever it is, you don't have to take a ferry to get there.

But, looking again at the stories, it turns out that Ellen gave the name of the town (West Kingston); hell, she gave us not only the ZIP code of the post office, but also the latitude and longitude! And, looking it up, it is located in the mainland, in the western part of the state (west of the bay). So, no need for either ferries or bridges to get there, coming from the mid-west.


Don't call me Shirley. You will surely make me surly.
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7281] Sat, 25 August 2012 03:50 Go to previous messageGo to next message
stanman  is currently offline stanman
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Thanks> A case of misinformation in a name.
Re: Can you see a difference? [message #7292] Mon, 27 August 2012 11:03 Go to previous message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
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A case of lack of research.
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