Home » Computing » Geek City » schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices
schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #6997] Mon, 03 October 2011 20:05 Go to next message
Erin  is currently offline Erin
Messages: 7
Registered: October 2011
Junior Member
Hey peeps!

I was wondering if there are any good descriptions of the door stops tuck uses,and the door to his room? I am sure there is more cool geeky stuff i want to make but this is what comes off my head tonight..


Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #6998] Tue, 04 October 2011 01:17 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Erin  is currently offline Erin
Messages: 7
Registered: October 2011
Junior Member
well I got a rough idea on the door stops, wood triangles with rubber bars on the bottom for traction. Also thinking of putting some sort of spike in the back to hold it down on diff surfaces. the door seems like a done deal number lock and perhaps some reinforcment in the steel door? perhaps one of those fire doors.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #6999] Tue, 04 October 2011 04:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Brooke  is currently offline Brooke
Messages: 695
Registered: August 2004
Location: Portland, OR
Senior Member
I get the impression that the door stops were just wooden wedges. If you apply a bit of pressure, such will jam nicely in most doors. And being plain wood, they'd be a lot less suspicious than your version.

As for the door to Tuck's room, I wonder if he made the same mistake the manager did with a computer room in a rather infamous incident.

Seems that the manager insisted (over the objections of senior staff) on having a reinforced, high security door (that used a key) put on the computer room.

Sure enough, one day the operator forgot to take the keys with him. And the person with other keys wasn't in that day.

It was going to take hours to get a locksmith and they needed in sooner.

One of the senior staffers said he could get in if the manager who'd insisted on the door would sign off on it. He had several copies of something he printed up saying the the manager approved whatever was necessary to get into the room.

The manager signed off, and the staffer took a couple of copies off somewhere. Then he came back and kicked a hole in the drywall next to the door, reached in and unlocked the door.

The manager screamed bloody murder. But the staffer *did* have the signature. And made a point of saying that *this* was why he'd been against the high security door in the first place.

Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7000] Tue, 04 October 2011 04:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Erin  is currently offline Erin
Messages: 7
Registered: October 2011
Junior Member
makes sense brooke, perhaps i shall try to find some wooden door stops.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7001] Tue, 04 October 2011 07:44 Go to previous messageGo to next message
CaroL  is currently offline CaroL
Messages: 6
Registered: July 2011
Junior Member
That staffer thinks enough outside the box and thinks ahead to cover himself. He'd be a good burglar, cop, whatever. I get the impression that the wedges that Tuck carries around are maybe not as large as the ones he has in his room? He sometimes retrieves them from his pack, a coat pocket, purse. And you could investigate how thick they would have to be at the large end to be effective. I have stayed in a few hotel and motel rooms during my travels that have transoms under the door that might render the wedges ineffective due to the space between the door bottom and the floor when open, and tight enough fitting when the door closes to make a wedge not work well.

A telescoping bar with a rubber tip on the floor end and a yoke on the door handle end might be better in that case. Might have to tinker with the yoke a bit to make it fit flush or collapse into the tube when not in use. With threaded segments that could be locked into place with a twist, sorta like one of the legs on a portable tripod, it could work with a little tinkering and collapse into, say, a 6 inch tube? Would have to be steel, not aluminium. The latter would be too fragile to stand up to determined entry. Hmmm, if the segments could be spring loaded, then when extended part way or fully it could be an ad hoc defensive weapon too?

CaroL

[Updated on: Tue, 04 October 2011 08:09]

Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7002] Tue, 04 October 2011 23:25 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Sir Lee  is currently offline Sir Lee
Messages: 440
Registered: October 2003
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Senior Member
You are overthinking it. There are ready-made door wedges in a variety of materials in many stores. They are usually purchased to keep a door *open*.

I didn't test them personally, but I think hard rubber ones might be the best choice.


Don't call me Shirley. You will surely make me surly.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7003] Fri, 07 October 2011 01:34 Go to previous messageGo to next message
mkemp  is currently offline mkemp
Messages: 421
Registered: April 2006
Senior Member
About the security door: many times the interior partition stops at the dropped ceiling, just like the utility closet in the dress shop in part 8. Stepladder, up-n-over the partition. Simple.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7006] Fri, 07 October 2011 21:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Sir Lee  is currently offline Sir Lee
Messages: 440
Registered: October 2003
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Senior Member
In fact, I remember Tuck having attic access from inside his wardrobe. Which means that theoretically, somebody could use this way to get in. But the door is probably latched from the inside. Which means it would have to be forced.

Another easy way to get in would be put a ladder to the window and break the glass. There are several ways to circumvent the lock, but none that wouldn't leave some evident damage. The lock is a deterrent to snooping, not a protection against invasion. Otherwise, I don't think Bill would have allowed it. Particularly considering Tuck's history of health problems.


Don't call me Shirley. You will surely make me surly.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7008] Sat, 08 October 2011 06:59 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Erin  is currently offline Erin
Messages: 7
Registered: October 2011
Junior Member
Yeah that is what I would be using them for as well. a deterent, and to keep casual snoopers and sticky fingers outa my space. I don't expect them to stop a forced entry, just a slight peace of mind.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7051] Thu, 22 March 2012 03:04 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Doragoon  is currently offline Doragoon
Messages: 334
Registered: September 2002
Location: Everett, WA
Senior Member

My thought about the door wedges, is that they worked more like pennying a door closed than a normal door stop. At least that's how I used them when I took to carrying around with me in college (because of reading about them in tuck). if you use them like a normal door stop, not only do you have problems with the carpet surface, but you can just push something under the door and knock it out. If you put the wedges in the top of the door frame, they are MUCH more difficult to reach from the other side. these are usually thinner, and smaller, but you need more to make sure you have one the size that will fit.

In my experience, this isn't fool proof. It's only about as effective as a normal VERY stuck door you have to kick to open. Thus it's more effective against some people than others depending on how willing they are to force a stuck door. The great thing about this method is that it can jam a door that opens away from you.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7448] Sun, 20 January 2013 13:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
stanman  is currently offline stanman
Messages: 292
Registered: May 2008
Senior Member
Remember that Tuck has learned from his dad who is a veteran. So more than likely, Tuck has designed devices equal to anything or superior to ant present dat off the rack versions
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7449] Mon, 21 January 2013 00:12 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
Messages: 355
Registered: April 2012
Senior Member
Razz It seems to me (having occasionally worked as a carpenter) that any scrap piece of wood in a wedge shape would do. And a bit of tapping on one with a hammer would wedge a door closed to the point that getting it open would be problematic at best!
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7450] Mon, 21 January 2013 20:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Sir Lee  is currently offline Sir Lee
Messages: 440
Registered: October 2003
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Senior Member
Yes, but "any old scrap of wood" is probably far from ideal. I have seen plastic and hard rubber door wedges for sale in hardware stores and such. They would be lighter, more effective and with less sharp corners to poke you when carried in a backpack. I consider it likely that Tuck invested in a couple of them at some point; they aren't that expensive.


Don't call me Shirley. You will surely make me surly.
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7451] Tue, 22 January 2013 09:05 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
Messages: 355
Registered: April 2012
Senior Member
True, and a hard rubber one would be as good as a wood one. Unless Tuck took some time in the workshop to purpose make some wood ones. And even then they would tend to be a bit more fragile than a good rubber one.

[Updated on: Tue, 22 January 2013 09:05]

Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7493] Fri, 01 March 2013 19:03 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ellen Hayes  is currently offline Ellen Hayes
Messages: 684
Registered: September 2002
Senior Member
What I was thinking, was the hard rubber ones. Brown, in my mind, for no apparent reason; I guess that's what I've seen or remember from, uh... somewhere.

As for the door (now, alas, dead; unless he's repaired the power cable), it, like much of Tuck's cool stuff, is more a concept, an exercise in ingenuity and demonstration, and a fuck-you-you-sibling-fuckers than really intended to be HIGH security. One should tailor one's security to the threat, after all; and the biggest threat to Tuck's room (that he would be allowed to respond against) was his siblings.
His parents would've demanded (and gotten) overrides or some such, or Bill would've made it be removed.

The attic/closet door is alarmed (at least to the point of being recorded), and as well the closet door could have a lock on it that opens from the OUTside.
Note, though, that the closet is not a freestanding box of wood, as Rachel Greenham once thought; it's a walk-in.

Now don't go telling people I never explained anything. =)

Ellen
Re: schematics & descriptions of Tuck's devices [message #7522] Sat, 09 March 2013 22:30 Go to previous message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
Messages: 355
Registered: April 2012
Senior Member
Ellen Hayes wrote on Fri, 01 March 2013 16:03



The attic/closet door is alarmed (at least to the point of being recorded), and as well the closet door could have a lock on it that opens from the OUTside.
Note, though, that the closet is not a freestanding box of wood, as Rachel Greenham once thought; it's a walk-in.

Now don't go telling people I never explained anything. =)

Ellen



I know if I had a door that opened to a common attic it would be locked from my side! Even a simple dead bolt with the flip type of 'key' and a regular keyway on the other side would suffice. Thus I could get out in a hurry but getting in would be an issue.
Previous Topic:Where's The Chat? (And When?)
Next Topic:I'm not a geek
Goto Forum:
  


Current Time: Tue Dec 18 16:20:13 EST 2018

Total time taken to generate the page: 0.02231 seconds
.:: Contact :: Home ::.

Powered by: FUDforum 2.7.7.
Copyright ©2001-2007 FUD Forum Bulletin Board Software