Home » Computing » Privacy Issues » "Trusted Computing" and why you shouldn't trust it
"Trusted Computing" and why you shouldn't trust it [message #2857] Sat, 20 November 2004 15:59 Go to next message
Ellen Hayes  is currently offline Ellen Hayes
Messages: 684
Registered: September 2002
Senior Member
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/tcpa-faq.html

Why should you care? Tuck is not licensed; I cannot afford licensing of this sort, nor will I (as a matter of morals) allow such licensing.
You might not be able to read Tuck in ten years without rebooting your computer and crippling it for as long as you read.
That's why.


Ellen
nosig
Re: "Trusted Computing" and why you shouldn't trust it [message #2859] Sun, 21 November 2004 16:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
stripes  is currently offline stripes
Messages: 14
Registered: November 2004
Location: Canada, thank God
Junior Member
Ellen Hayes wrote on Sat, 20 November 2004 15:59

Why should you care? Tuck is not licensed; I cannot afford licensing of this sort, nor will I (as a matter of morals) allow such licensing.
You might not be able to read Tuck in ten years without rebooting your computer and crippling it for as long as you read.
That's why.



Yech. Well, they've been talking about "Trusted Computing" for a while now. I am just hoping that customers have the brains to know when a technology is not in their interest and not buy it. At least in the long run.

Of course, this hope is not helped by my recent encounter with Macrovision. I always have the temptation to snap the DVD in half when a "Macrovision: ensuring quality" banner appears. Macrovision, for those who have not had to deal with the MPAA and their rubber-gloved policies, is a system by which DVDs can tlle your DVD player to jam the output composite signal so that if it's fed to a VCR or encoded into RF it gets horribly mangled. This is supposed to make it difficult to record movies from DVD to VHS (which is a slower, more cumbersome, more expensive, and lower-quality option than simply duplicating the DVD). In practice, it means that you must buy an expensive special-purpose adapter to connect your DVD player to any television without direct RGB input. (My working theory for why DVD makers implement it is that they would happily sell you a modern TV to view it on.) This special adapter still doesn't work right - colors disappear once in a while.

But ultimately, I think customers will notice that it is not to their advantage to give Microsoft (and any clever enough hacker) the ability to give their computer a short-arm inspection at any time. And, with luck, at that point they will still have other options. (Consider the various open-source computer designs, from LART-like boards based on standard CPUs to open CPU projects, to the possibilities of an FPGA-based CPU...) And if, say, Microsoft makes it impossible to use any Microsoft software or play any major-label music without bending over, well, there are already pretty satisfactory alternatives to both.

To be fair, to get real computer security (i.e. military grade) you do need some of these features - but they should be under the control of the one who owns the computer.

Allover
Re: "Trusted Computing" and why you shouldn't trust it [message #7124] Tue, 17 July 2012 11:48 Go to previous messageGo to next message
MarkReed  is currently offline MarkReed
Messages: 1
Registered: July 2012
Junior Member
This is the first I've heard of this issue. After reading the post, the topic is certainly alarming. Luckily, the worst predictions the link warned of have not happened.

It's been a decade since the linked message was written. What does 'Trusted Computing' look like today? Is the movement still active? How successful has it been?
Re: "Trusted Computing" and why you shouldn't trust it [message #7125] Tue, 17 July 2012 23:05 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
Messages: 355
Registered: April 2012
Senior Member
IDK what trusted computing looks like now but I think that the migration to the 'cloud' presents some truly spooky situations. Among others it tends to shut the 'poor' out of the world that should open up to them as 'rich' people shed older technology...

Of course Open Source Software will still make older hardware work but the learning curve can be quite steep.
Re: "Trusted Computing" and why you shouldn't trust it [message #7126] Tue, 17 July 2012 23:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Sir Lee  is currently offline Sir Lee
Messages: 440
Registered: October 2003
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Senior Member
Uhhh... there's all sorts of this stuff going on. Take iOS, for instance: it's designed to only allow software to run if it's signed by Apple and downloaded from the App Store. Of course, there are jailbreaks... but jailbreaking has its problems too.

Some Android phones come with locked bootloaders too, so in theory you can only run software provided by the phone maker. Fortunately, workarounds have been found in most cases and they have few if any shortcomings besides voiding the phone's warranty.

Windows is apparently going the same way: the "Metro" environment in Windows 8 will probably be as locked up as iOS and ARM Windows 8 tablets are required to have a locked bootloader.

So, no, it didn't "go away." It's actually happening all the time, only in a more subtle form.

[Updated on: Tue, 17 July 2012 23:48]


Don't call me Shirley. You will surely make me surly.
Re: "Trusted Computing" and why you shouldn't trust it [message #7135] Fri, 20 July 2012 00:05 Go to previous message
Anne  is currently offline Anne
Messages: 355
Registered: April 2012
Senior Member
UGH! I knew there was a reason to start considering the raspberry pi!
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